EN

Čebelarski muzej v Radovljici

THE MUSEUM OF APICULTURE

Since opening in 1959, this museum has specialised in maintaining the heritage of Slovenian beekeeping by keeping records, collecting, storing, documenting, representing and popularising this tradition. Its quarters are in the Baroque Mansion House in the old part of the town.

The museum’s exhibits represent the three key themes that mark Slovenian beekeeping: an indigenous race of bees, world renowned beekeepers and painted beehive panels.

... read more

Anton Janša (1734–1773) was appointed as a teacher of beekeeping at the Beekeeping School in Vienna by decree of the Empress Maria Theresa. His two books show his own method of beekeeping that he successfully implemented at the school together with some important findings pertaining to the biology of bees.

The priest Peter Pavel Glavar (1721–1784) was a successful farm and beekeeping manager. He wrote suggestions for improvements in beekeeping, proposed the introduction of beekeeping schools and is the author of the first Slovenian beekeeping text (a translation and amendment of Janša’s “A treatise on bee swarming”.)

The material in the second room covers the period from the middle of the 19th century to the mid 20th century. Besides displaying perfected beekeeping tools and various types of beehives one can also see information about: the world renowned Jan Strgar (a breeder and merchant of queen bees) and Mihael Ambrožič (a merchant of live bees), the designer of the modern beehive and Anton Žnideršič, a prominent writer on the subject of beekeeping and beekeeping literature.

The central part of museum is dedicated to the display of painted frontal boards of bee hives – panjske končnice. In the middle of the 18th century, painted decorations began to appear on the frontal sides of popular beehives, known as ‘kranjiči’. The templates for the motifs used in these paintings were representations of sacral art, the illustrated bible, icons, glass paintings and graphic sheets.

Today, all the known motifs include over 600 varieties. Older and more numerous are those motifs with a sacral content (mostly representing saints). Among the most common are Mary as the universal protector, also depicted on the oldest known painted frontal board (dating back to 1758) and St. Florian. The group of secular motifs is composed of imaginary scenes (e.g. animals in human roles, ridiculing craftsmen, human faults), hunting scenes, historic themes (military scenes, historic figures) and scenes from everyday life.

Beehive painting, which was most prolific between 1820 and 1880, started to die away with the transition into the 20th century. Painting on the frontal panels of beehives is a particularity of the Slovenian Alpine region and is an indispensable part of Slovenian folk art.

The biological room serves to acquaint visitors with the biology of the indigenous Slovenian Carniolan bee (Kranjska čebela) or the Grey bee of Carniola (Kranjska sivka). Close-up photographs of bees, an introduction to the bees’ main pastures, sounds from beehives, live bees in an observation beehive (from spring to autumn) and further photos of bees’ pastures vividly show the life and labour of bees. The main theme is rounded off by the introduction of symbolism that is expressed by the image of a bee (e.g. medals, money).

Modern day beekeeping is illustrated by a part of a beehive typical of the Gorenjska region in its actual size and with a modern day beekeeping framework. The space is simultaneously used to show video recordings about beekeeping in Slovenia.

The path through the museum ends in the room for occasional and casual exhibitions that pertain to beekeeping (e.g. an exhibition of carved models for honey pastries, a representation of a maker of copies of frontal boards, products made by kindergarten and elementary school children).

Opening hours:

January, February
Tuesday – Friday: 8.00–15.00
March, April, November, December
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday: 8.00–15.00
Wednesday, Saturday, Sunday: 10.00–12.00, 15.00–17.00
May, June, July, August, September, Oktober
Tuesday – Sunday: 10.00–18.00

Mestni muzej Radovljica

MUNICIPIAL MUSEUM OF RADOVLJICA

The baroque palace, situated in Radovljica’s old town centre on Linhart Square, is home to the Municipal Museum of Radovljica. A walk through the town’s streets gives visitors the impression as if time had been stopped in its tracks over two hundred years ago. During 18th century, a time of great intellectual, political and social change, especially in Europe, one of the most famous Slovenes, i.e. Anton Tomaž Linhart (1756–1795), intellectual and Slovenian representative of modern Slovene historiography and high state official, was born in Radovljica. The exhibition ANTON TOMAŽ LINHART (1756–1795), »Now I am thinking about how to become famous« is dedicated to him.

Opening hours:

January, February
Tuesday – Friday: 8.00–15.00
March, April, November, December
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday: 8.00–15.00
Wednesday, Saturday, Sunday: 10.00–12.00, 15.00–17.00
May, June, July, August, September, Oktober
Tuesday – Sunday: 10.00–18.00

 

Šivčeva Hiša v Radovljici

ŠIVEC HOUSE ART GALLERY

Šivec House, a bourgeois house from the middle of the 16th century, is set in the historic centre of Radovljica. It, is classified as one of a group of important cultural monuments of late Gothic architecture with its rich exterior and interior architectural image. After restoration in 1976, all of its original beauty was uncovered. This, included the facade with its painting and variegated architectural elements as well as interior with collonaded entrance hall, and kitchen, granary and on the first floor, a representation of living quarters. Nowadays, this room with its extraordinary ambiance serves as a wedding hall, and the collonaded entrance hall houses as an art gallery.

... read more

Šivec House is situated in a row of two-storey buildings along the south-west side of Linhart Square. From here, almost the whole of the old town centre can be seen, which is today a protected cultural monument. In comparison to similar towns in the Gorenjska region, including Kranj, Škofja Loka and Kamnik, Radovljica is relatively small in size. This has been determined by its strategic location on a natural promontory. Just as in the majority of settlements with a medieval design, Radovljica too has the following architectural entities: An ecclesiastical area with the parish church of St. Peter, a rectory and a nunnery, a section for lords with Thurn-Valsassina’s baroque castle and the bourgeois Vidic house, a defence system with the only preserved defensive ditch in Slovenia and a bourgeois area with houses of merchants and craftsmen from the past.

Šivec House is named after its last owners who sold it to the municipality of Radovljica in the 1970’s. Under the patronage of the architect Dr. Peter First and under the organizsation of the Institute for Heritage Preservation Kranj, various experts spent years uncovering its qualities layer by layer. By the year 1976 it had been restored and was then subsequently opened to the public. Since then it has been under the governance of Radovljica Municipality Museums. The house was again partly restored, or rather extended in 2001.

Šivec House and its architectural details represent a perfect example of bourgeois architecture of the second half of the 16th century. At that time, Radovljica of that time experienced the largest economic development and its people who, under the influence of renaissance, had a desire to live in a more comfortable manner and to have more representative houses. The ground floor of Šivec House has three quarters which today house, an art gallery. This was originally the location of a shop, a workshop and a warehouse, whilst a farm building was later added. The first ground floor quarter has a “late-Gothic” design, giving the impression of the ambience of a church. The columns that give rise to a four-pole cross-ribbed arch divide it into two naves. The second room is lowered, smaller and arched.

From the ground floor, a staircase leads up to the living quarters. From the entrance hall, which is decorated with a balustre fence, one enters through distinct portals into the central living quarters, kitchen, pantry and into an external arched hall. The central living quarter is covered with an original wooden wainscot and has a richly profiled wooden ceiling. The furniture and equipment is newer and has been adapted to serve as a wedding hall. The kitchen is a proof of the high living standards of that time as it has a specially dedicated quarter that also contains a cooker hood. A gothic portal connects it with a lower lying pantry where foods and all other goods were stored in chests.

The facade of Šivec House is richly painted with “stitched” corners and with a central fresco depicting a scene of the Merciful Samaritan in a richly adorned frame (from the 17th century). There is figural decoration above the windows of the first floor. An interesting decorative and architectural element is the so called balcony that was used to increase the surface area of the floor. The portal is from green perak stone of a later period and was kept because of static reasons.

The gallery of Šivec House has two units: a gallery that annually hosts up to ten exhibitions of domestic and foreign artists and a permanently set collection of illustrations by children and youths. These works have been displayed as a permanent exhibition since June 2003.

Opening hours:

January – April, November, December
Tuesday – Sunday: 10.00–12.00, 16.00 – 18.00
May, June, September, Oktober
Tuesday – Sunday: 10.00–13.00, 16.00 – 19.00
July, August
Tuesday – Sunday: 10.00 – 13.00, 17.00 – 20.00

Kovaški muzej Kropa

IRON FORGING MUSEUM

The museum is located in the central part of the old square, in Klinar’s house, which is an example of a higher quality of ironworks architecture with building elements from the 18th and 19th centuries. The first floor, which used to serve as an apartment for the families of ironworkers, has a preserved typical central room, a salon which features a cassette ceiling that is completed by three baroque canvases.

The Blacksmith Museum was opened in 1952 as the first Technical museum in Slovenia. It shows the technical and historical development of iron handling from ore to nail; the economic, social and cultural conditions in Kropa and nearby ironworking location since the 15th century until the decline of the ironworks in the 19th century and the manufacture of handmade nails in the 20th century.

... read more

Documents represent the historic foundations of the ironworks in Kropa and models show images of the settlement in the 19th century and the working of the iron foundries, forges and bellows. The museum benefitted as a result of the 42 artistically forged works by the master Jože Bertoncelj in 1974. They are displayed in a special room within the museum.

The ethnological room shows the life of blacksmiths from Kropa, exposing their co-existence with the iron foundry workers in large iron foundry houses. The collection of nails has 94 types of preserved nails, from the smallest, used in shoemaking, to those that are 70cm long which were used in dam building. The exhibition also features specimens of special shoemaking nails for the manufacture of mountain footwear that were forged manually in Kropa until the mid 1950’s.

The projection room on the ground floor (accessible also to disabled persons) shows two Slovenian films by Milka and Metod Badjura, the blacksmiths of Kropa from the year 1954 and carol-singers from 1963. The first film shows the work and life of blacksmiths and the second shows the custom of carol singing. Both films feature numerous residents of Kropa as actors.

The museum also includes the technical monument vigenjc Vice, the only preserved nail factory for the manual forging of nails. This is an authentically preserved, partly wooden and partly brick-built building from the 18th century where nails were still forged in the first half of the 20th century. Group visits, with a display of manual forging, are possible by prior arrangement. It is located near the museum on a plain adjacent to the dam of the former ironworks in the upper part of Kropa.

Kropa

Kropa is a settlement with a centuries old tradition of ironworking and blacksmithing. It is one of the most important of Slovenia’s historic places due to its preserved architecture and technical heritage and has been protected as a cultural monument since the year 1953. It started to develop in the 14th century when the forest ironwork industry started to move from iron ore deposits on the Jelovica plateau towards the valleys and brooks. The remnants of the indigenous smelting furnace (Slovenian furnace) near Kropa come from this time. In the 15th century, there were two smelting furnaces that were built lower in the valley, the Lower (Spodnja) and Upper (Zgornja) foundries, and forges for the manufacture of nails. It has been established that over 100 different types of nails were for sale at home and abroad; the most typical among them being nails of the so-called Mediterranean assortment. In the 18th and the beginning of the 19th century, the time of the greatest proliferation of the Kropa ironworks, there were also seven iron foundries in addition to two forges, that took care of producing semi-manufactured goods and 19 nail factories that jointly provided a living for a little over 1000 people.

The smelting furnaces have been in operation since 1872 and 1880 respectively. At the end of the 19th century, due to the crisis and lack of ore, the furnaces were forced to stop production. However, a solution was found when an industrial co-operative was formed in 1894 and the lower smelting furnace started to grow into a factory plant for the manufacture of nails. It later became the screw factory Plamen which still operates to this day and where artistic iron works began to develop.

Opening hours:

January, February
Tuesday – Sunday: 8.00 – 15.00
March, April, November, December
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday: 8.00 – 15.00
Wednesday, Saturday, Sunday: 10.00 – 12.00, 15.00 – 17.00
May – October
Tuesday – Sunday: 10.00 – 18.00

Muzej Talcev - Begunje na Gorenjskem

MUSEUM OF HOSTAGES

There are a number of sacred places in Slovenia that are reminiscent of the suffering of people during the Second World War. Begunje na Gorenjskem is an idyllic village under the mountain Begunjščica, located seven kilometers north of Radovljica. The mighty Katzenstein Castle in the middle of the settlement served as a Gestapo prison during the time of Nazi occupation. In the years from 1941 to 1945, a total of 11,477 prisoners were interned, mostly followers of the resistance movement from Gorenjska, as well as from other Slovenian regions.

Opening hours:

January, February
closed
March, April, November, December
Wednesday and Saturday: 9.00 – 13.00
Sundays, holidays: 13.00 – 17.00
May, June, September, October
Tuesday – Friday: 9.00 – 13.00
Saturday, Sunday, holidays: 13.00 – 18.00
July, August
Tuesday – Sunday: 13.00 – 18.00

Contacts:

MUNICIPIAL MUSEUM OF RADOVLJICA
Linhartov trg 1
4240 Radovljica
Slovenia

Director:
Verena Štekar-Vidic:
04/ 532 05 21
verena.vidic@mro.si

MUSEUM OF APICULTURE
Linhartov trg 1
4240 Radovljica

Curator:
Mag. Tita Porenta
04/532 05 27
cebelarski.muzej@mro.si

MUNICIPIAL MUSEUM OF RADOVLJICA AND ANTON TOMAŽ LINHART
Linhartov trg 1
4240 Radovljica

Curator:
Katja Praprotnik
04/532 05 28
mestni.muzej@mro.si

ŠIVEC HOUSE
Linhartov trg 1
4240 Radovljica

Curator:
Barbara Boltar
04/532 05 23
galerija@mro.si

IRON FORGING MUSEUM
Kropa 10
4245 Kropa

Curator:
Saša Florjančič
04/533 72 01
kovaski.muzej@mro.si

Guide:
04/533 72 00
kovaski.muzej.kropa@mro.si

MUSEUM OF HOSTAGES
Begunje na Gorenjskem 55
4275 Begunje na Gorenjskem

Guide:
Svetislav Kostov
04/533 37 90
mro@mro.si

Comments are closed